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#Deepavali#diwali#Vastu shastra#vastu#vasturemedies#vastutips#vastuforkitchen#vastuexpert#astrologer

#DEEPAVALI#DEEPAWALI#DIWALI##E DIWALI PUJA#E DEWALI PUJAN#E DIWAL POJA

Deepavali or Diwali is the Biggest and most important festival for Indians. Diwali festival was celebrated every year by the Indians. The name itself elaborates the DEEPA means clay lamps and AVALI means Row which arranged all the Clay lamps in a row that Indian light outside of their houses on the Occasion. Diwali is a very important festival for the Hindu’s, They are very spiritual and work ship goddess Shri Maha Laxmi for the wealth and health. Since from many years, Deepavali is celebrated by Indians due to the national festival it was celebrated by all over the nation such as Hindus, Jains, Buddhists, and Sikhs etc.

In Northern India, Southern India and Western India celebrate the festival as per their interpret. In North India, Hindus celebrate the Diwali due to Lord Rama has returned to Ayodhya after defeated the King Ravana. Western India celebrates Diwali festival which marks the Lord Maha Vishnu who is the one of the Preserver of the Hindu’s Trinity, Sent the Evil King Bali to rule the Nether world. And South Indian’s celebrates Diwali festival marks the day that Lord Krishna defeated the Evil or Demon King Narakasura. In India, all the Hindus celebrate Diwali festival by lighting rows of Clay lamps and praying to Goddess Lakshmi by offering mouth-watering dishes.

Persons visit one another and exchange gifts as a part of the Diwali celebrations. Many people host house functions on this working day. It is a great a chance to bond with our relatives and friends. Many offices and residential communities host Diwali parties a day or two before the festivity.

Children especially look forward to lose fire crackers on this time. They gather around and rejoice the festival by simply burning different varieties of crackers.

It is believed that on this day Lord Rama, along with his consort Sita and loyal brother Lakshman was returning to his hometown Ayodhya after 14 long years of exile in the forest. He had just finished battling and overcoming the fierce demon king of Ceylon, Ravana, who had abducted Sita. In this battle he was ably helped by Lord Hanuman and his army of monkeys as well as an army of courageous bears PT.DEEPAK PANDEY ASTROLOGER.

The people of Ayodhya lit lamps in every home to welcome their true King as well as celebrate his victory over Ravana and also the safe return of their Queen Sita. They danced and made merry and lit firecrackers to express their joy over his return. And as a mark of respect and worship the festivities continue every year till this today.

As another lesser-known story goes, Lord Krishna had battled a demon called Narakasura and emerged victorious. The people of the city were overjoyed and welcomed Krishna back with lamps in their hands.

Since Rama and Krishna are two of the most popular gods in the Hindu lore, it is only logical that Diwali is celebrated with such pomp and glory.

“According to an ancient myth, Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth travels through all our homes on Diwali night and stops to bless the homes that are shiny and sparkling clean. So as this festival approaches, all houses go through a thorough spring-cleaning in anticipation of her wealth and blessings. She will be greeted by a beautiful gaily painted Rangoli on the threshold of each home while inside too she is welcomed by an array of sparklers and little earthen lamps that light up and considerably brighten the atmosphere.”

The actual festivities start from Dhanteras, which is celebrated two days before Diwali. Everybody goes out of their way to make big purchases and buy new clothes and jewellery. This is because this day is considered auspicious for wealth, and it is said that if you buy any silver or gold on this day, you will be lucky throughout the year. The goddess Lakshmi is worshipped on this day through a Lakshmipujan, which is performed not only in the homes but in shops and offices as well.

But what would Diwali be without a burst of firecrackers and lights? The sound and light show starts at least a week prior to the actual festival and continues way into the New Year. Of course it reaches a crescendo on the day of Diwali itself, a day when people dress up in their best new clothes and go visiting each other, their relatives and friends with boxes of dry fruits and sweets and loads of love in their huge generous hearts

Some mythical and historical reasons why Diwali (Deepavali) is celebrated annually :

1. Goddess Lakshmi’s Birthday:

On this very Diwali day, the Goddess of wealth, Lakshmi is said to have been incarnated from the depth of the bottomless ocean. The Hindu scriptures tell us that both Devas(gods) and Asuras (demons) were mortal (Mrita) at one point of time. Seeking a deathless condition (Amarattva), they churned the ocean to seek Amrita, the nectar of immortality (an event mentioned in the Hindu scriptures as "Samudra-manthan"), during which a host of divine celestial objects came up. Prime among these was Goddess Lakshmi, the daughter of the king of the milky ocean, who arose on the new moon day (amaavasyaa) of the Kartik month. She was subsequently married to Lord Vishnu on the same darkest night of the year and brilliant lamps were illuminated and placed in rows to mark this holy occassion.

Hence the association of Diwali with Goddess Lakshmi and the tradition of lighting of lamps and candles during the festival. To this day, Hindus celebrate the birth of the goddess Lakshmi and her marriage to Lord Vishnu on Diwali and seek her blessings for the coming year.

2. The Legend of King Mahabali: The Bhagavata Purana (also known as Srimad Bhagavatam), the most sacred Hindu text, reveals how on a Diwali day Lord Vishnu, in his fifth incarnation as Vaman-avtaara, rescued Lakshmi from the prison of King Bali during the Treta Yug. Bali, or rather King Mahabali, was a powerful demon king who ruled the earth. Powered by a boon granted to him by Lord Brahma, Bali was invincible and even gods failed to defeat him in battles. Although a wise and perfect king otherwise, Mahabali was violent in his ways with the Devas (gods). On their insistence, Lord Vishnu disguised himself as a short Brahmin and approached Bali for some charity. The righteous and benevolent King couldn't refuse the Brahmin's offer and was tricked into giving up his kingship and wealth (of which Lakshmi is said to be the Goddess). Diwali marks this overcoming of Mahabali by Lord Vishnu and this is another reason why Goddess Lakshmi is worshipped on Diwali.

In Kerala, the festival of 'Onam' is celebrated around the month of August to mark this legend.

3. The Killing of Narakasura: The Bhagavata Purana tells us about Narakasura, an evil demon king who had managed to acquire awesome powers. Unrivalled in prowess, he conquered both the heavens and earth and was tyrannical in his reign. Addicted to power, he even stole the earrings of Aditi, the heavenly mother goddess, and usurped some of her territory. When Lord Vishnu was incarnated as Krishna in the Dwapara Yuga, he killed Narakasura on the day preceding Diwali and rescued 16,000 women whom the demon had imprisoned in his palace. The deliverance from the terrible Narakasura was celebrated with much grandeur, a tradition that continues to this day.

However, another version of the story credits Lord Krishna's wife Sathyabhama as the one who eliminated Narakasura. It is said that Narakasura could only be killed by his mother Bhudevi and as Satyabhama was an incarnation of the same Bhudevi, she only could kill him. Before death, however, Narakasura realized his mistake and requested a boon from Satyabhama that everyone should celebrate his death with colorful light. To commemorate his death, the event is celebrated in some parts of India as Naraka Chaturdasi, two days before Diwali day.

4. The Return of the Pandavas: The great Hindu epic ‘Mahabharata’ reveals that it was ‘Kartik Amavashya’ (the new moon day of the Kartik month) when the Pandavas appeared from their 12 years of banishment as a result of their defeat in the hands of the Kauravas at the game of dice (gambling). The five Pandava brothers, their mother and their wife Draupadi were honest, kind, gentle and caring in their ways and were loved by all their subjects. To celebrate the joyous occassion of their return to Hastinapura and to welcome back the Pandavas, the common people illuminated their state by lighting bright earthen lamps everywhere. And the tradition is maintained to this day.

5. The Victory of Rama: The great Hindu epic ‘Ramayana’ describes how Lord Ram (the incarnation of Lord Vishnu in the Treta Yug) conquered Lanka after vanquishing the evil King Ravana and after passing a period of of fourteen years in exile returned to his capital Ayodhya on a new moon day of Kartik with wife Sita and brother Lakshman. To celebrate the homecoming of their beloved king, the people of Ayodhya burst crackers, lit up their houses with earthen lamps (diyas), and decorated the entire city in the grandest manner. Year after year this homecoming of Lord Rama is commemorated on Diwali with lights, fireworks, bursting of crackers and merriment. The festival gets its name Deepawali, or Diwali, from the rows (avali) of lamps (deepa) that the people of Ayodhya lit to welcome their King.

there are several reasons behind Diwali celebrations and almost every region of India has its own reason to observe the occasion. All of these however, matters little to the festival itself. Whatever the cause behind its celebration, Diwali is undoubtedly a national festival of India, and the aesthetic aspect of the festival is enjoyed by most Indians regardless of faith.

PT.DEEPAK PANDEY INDIA'

E ASTROLOGER & E VAASTU SHASTRA EXPERIENCE 9305360382

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